A Baker's Delight: The Infinity Oven is Smoke Free and Fuel Free

A team of engineering students from the University of Cambridge just unveiled a new “freshly baked” invention.

 

Daniel Cox, Keno Marie-Ghae, Leyla Sudbury, and William Hatcher are the inventors of the Infinity Oven, which is a cost-effective solution that allows bakery owners in developing countries to utilize the powers of the sun to bake and even cook in a more sustainable manner – fuel free and smoke free.

Daniel Cox, Keno Marie-Ghae, Leyla Sudbury, and William Hatcher are the inventors of the Infinity Oven.Daniel Cox, Keno Marie-Ghae, Leyla Sudbury, and William Hatcher are the inventors of the Infinity Oven.

The team cooked up the idea for the Infinity Oven while doing research on cooking approaches in developing counties. They learned that cooking with firewood is not safe and unsustainable as it leads to deforestation. And, cooking with fossil fuels, gas, and coal, is costly and also unsustainable. Even more interesting, they were alarmed with the fact that cooking indoors is dangerous as smoke leads to serious health issues that includes asphyxiation and a plethora of cancers.

Using Burundi - a developing country in Southeast Africa - as a test-incubator market, the team designed and developed a number of prototypes, and earlier this year launched their final product, the Infinity Oven (also called the Infinity Bakery).

Infinity OvenInfinity Oven

“The Infinity Oven harnesses sunlight to heat the oven to temperatures up to 220 degrees,” says Cox. “It achieves this by using a large parabolic dish to concentrate the sun’s rays… The box is double glazed on the sides and bottom which allows for light to heat the oven, while at the same time trapping air and preventing the heat from escaping out.”

The oven has two separate chambers and each is equipped with a thermometer in the side panels which monitors cooking temperatures.

The oven is actually made from recycled oil drums and simple materials accessible for Burundi bakers – wood, bamboo, and clay.

While the students from the University of Cambridge – a highly esteemed academic institution – are making a positive difference for bakers and cooks in Burundi, they know their invention will soon take off in other developing countries.

At the same time, they are thrilled that their discovery will protect the environment and help save lives.