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Can Nature's Forms And Sounds Help The Sleepless?

We know that art has been inspired by nature at least as far back as the Cave Man. Technology too has had a love affair with nature for thousands of years, though we are just recently experiencing a resurgence with a new 'biomimicry' movement.  But besides biomimetic art and technology, there are biomimetic exercises, such as those we find in certain yoga positions... and now, an NYU design student and insomniac, has employed the shapes and sounds of nature to help the sleepless sleep.

 Cocoon by Filipa Tomaz: image via PSFKCocoon by Filipa Tomaz: image via PSFK

Cocoon diagram by Filipa Tomaz: image via cargocollectiveCocoon diagram by Filipa Tomaz: image via cargocollective

 

Filipa Tomaz calls her biomimicry project 'Cocooning.'  She has created several pieces of furniture and pillows of various forms that are designed to provide maximum calm, like the cocoon-like sleep chair above, which rocks and emits the sounds of gentle ocean tides and spashes on shoreline rocks.

Each of Tomaz's body forming designs incorporates a sleep-inducing technology inspired by nature.  This body pillow, for example, beats to the user's heart rate, vibrating gently with a sound wave that follows the beat until the heart rate is normalized.

 

Cocoon heart rate stabilizer by Filipa Tomaz: image via PSFKCocoon heart rate stabilizer by Filipa Tomaz: image via PSFK    Cocoon diagram by Filipa Tomaz: image via cargocollectiveCocoon diagram by Filipa Tomaz: image via cargocollective

 


The body-interlaced pillow supports the neck, sacrum and legs, while its gentle vibrations measure muscle tension, and evolves into a soft 'Om' as muscles relax.

 

Cocoon neck and back support pillow by Filipa Tomaz: image via PSFKCocoon neck and back support pillow by Filipa Tomaz: image via PSFK

 

Cocoon diagram by Filipa Tomaz: image via cargocollectiveCocoon diagram by Filipa Tomaz: image via cargocollective

 

Ms. Tomaz writes:  Cocooning” is an exercise in affective technology and seamless body-object interaction. Its aim is to conduce the body into a state of rest and promote wellness. Under the premise that the body learns viscerally, these body-objects are behavioral change companions.

Do you suffer from insomnia?  What is your best guess about the effectiveness of the Cocoon designs?  I'm willing to bet these biomimetic designs become successful sleep aid products!

Cargocollective via PFSK