CERN Scientists Set to Make Contact with Parallel Universe with Large Hadron Collider

Call this a mindbender-of-an-experiment.

A popular atom smasher will soon be turned on at full force so that it might discover - and perhaps form - small black holes.

Scientists at CERN (Conseil Européen pour la Recherche Nucléaire, or the European Council for Nuclear Research) in Switzerland are making an effort to find a new universe.

Yes, this is history in the making alright.

CERN Image: Early next week the 27km Large Hadron Collider (LHC) will get to work and set out to prove the “rainbow gravity” theory is in fact a reality.CERN Image: Early next week the 27km Large Hadron Collider (LHC) will get to work and set out to prove the “rainbow gravity” theory is in fact a reality.

Early next week the 27km Large Hadron Collider (LHC) will get to work and set out to prove the “rainbow gravity” theory is in fact a reality. This theory suggests that the universe runs forever with no actual starting point. The findings from this project, if true, would deflate the Big Bang theory altogether.

The massive collider runs via an underground tunnel between France and Switzerland. Scientists had turned it off two years ago in order to upgrade it for next week’s experiment.


The project could be a game changer as they will push the laws of physics to new heights.

So here is how the Large Hadron Collider and the experiment to make contact with a parallel universe will work. The circular tunnels inside the large unit will test beams of particles through the use of forceful magnets. The particles will move and crash together, while high-powered-state-of-the-art sensors record data from all the the activity. Scientists at CERN plan to have energy levels as high as 13 tera electron volts (TeV).

The large-scale experiment, historical in every sense, will be conducted throughout 2015.

CERN Image: The massive collider runs via an underground tunnel between France and Switzerland.CERN Image: The massive collider runs via an underground tunnel between France and Switzerland.

Two years ago scientists at CERN discovered Higgs Boson which provides mass to other particles. They shocked the world with this discovery and now they expect to the same in their quest for find dark matter. Dark matter is invisible but yet it is suggested to link galaxies together as its materials makes up most of the mass of the universe.

“Just as many parallel sheets of paper, which are two dimensional objects [breadth and length] can exist in a third dimension [height], parallel universes can also exist in higher dimensions,” says Mir Faizal, one of the lead researchers at CERN.

“We predict that gravity can leak into extra dimensions, and if it does, then miniature black holes can be produced at the LHC. Normally, when people think of the multiverse, they think of the many-worlds interpretation of quantum mechanics, where every possibility is actualized. This cannot be tested and so it is philosophy and not science.”

Faizal adds, “This is not what we mean by parallel universes. What we mean is real universes in extra dimensions.”

“As gravity can flow out of our universe into the extra dimensions, such a model can be tested by the detection of mini black holes at the LHC. We have calculated the energy at which we expect to detect these mini black holes in ‘gravity's rainbow’ - a new scientific theory. If we do detect mini black holes at this energy, then we will know that both gravity's rainbow and extra dimensions are correct.”

So, will scientists at CERN discover that parallel universe? We will know not long after the switch to the Large Hardon Collider gets turned on.

If one thing is for sure the project is now in the hands of nature.