Log in   •   Sign up   •   Subscribe  feed icon

The Coolest Way To Read In The Dark: LED Reading Glasses

The newest thing in reading at night makes more sense than a lamp, an LED book light, and certainly a flash light.  It not only creates maximum efficiency by focusing on what you're viewing, but it can be used for more than just reading!

 

 

This cool pair of reading glasses have super-bright white LED lights built into each corner of the lens frame.  The frame holds their four small batteries and they are good for up to 30 hours of illumination.  The lights automatically turn on when the frame is opened and turn off when the frame is closed.

Those little book lights, the battery-operated LED lamps that hook onto your book...  They're cute, but they have their limitations; the biggest one being that they're not very stable on anything else but a hardcover book. Try them on a magazine or a newspaper and watch them flop over!

The other huge drawback is that when you move the book, even just to turn a page, the book light moves with it and ends up blinding your formerly-asleep partner.  I can tell you that partners don't take a shine to that.

So the LED Reading Glasses are a winner from two perspectives.  They enable you to read anything comfortably and you can keep them from waking up your partner... just don't look!  (if you happen to glance at your sleeping partner, the small lights from two sources create a more diffuse illumination than the book light, so are less likely to disturb her.)

And think about the convenience of being able to use your computer at night without turning on the room lights. Though the computer screen creates it's own light, the LED Reading Glasses will help you see your keyboard!

The LED Reading Glasses are also great for searching in small spaces, like when you are trying to find your chimney flu, or replacing a fuse, or searching for wires behind your drywall....  Hands free!

In my book, the LED Reading Glasses are a winner!  But there is one drawback: the glasses are only available with refractive lenses.  In other words, you have to need magnifying lenses to be able to read.  They are available in 1.5, 2.0, and 2.5 diopter. With a lifetime guarantee.

Update: Hammacher no longer have these glasses. You can now get these LED glasses at Amazon instead. You can check out the whole LED assortment here.

Keeping you posted...

SEE ALSO: CliC Readers Review: The Hidden Secrets of CliC Reading Glasses

 

Comments
May 4, 2009
by Anonymous

wouldn't it be better

to have clipon lights that you clip on the place that those are right now so you can add them to any glasses. That probably exists already though I guess

May 4, 2009
by Anonymous

I may come across as a

I may come across as a grammar Nazi here, but doesn't "presbyotic" describe vision loss with age? I believe the correct term in this context is "myopic."

These frames are truly kickin', however.

May 4, 2009
by Boomer Babe

Yep, I meant 'presbyotic.'

It's not grammar, and you're not a Nazi... but presbyotic is what I meant.  Reading glasses that are sold with magnifying lenses like the ones in these glasses, are sold to people in their 40's and above.  As you get older, your close-up vision deteriorates and many people just buy these 'see better' solutions, rather than getting an optometrist's prescription for each eye. 

Glad you like these!  And thanks for writing.

May 5, 2009
by Anonymous

Presbyotic

Your commenter was correct in questioning your meaning though. Presbyopia is indeed age-related vision change...but it's towards *far*sightedness...not near-sightedness as you stated.

May 5, 2009
by Boomer Babe

Presbyotic

Yes, you are correct.  I removed the word presbyotic from the text, so there is no further misstatement, misreading, or misunderstanding.  While some presbyotic persons may need magnifying lenses to see close-up, they may also need corrective lenses to see far away.

Thanks for writing in!

May 15, 2009
by Anonymous

Been done.

This idea/product has been around for a long long time. this is just an update of technology from little AAA flashlights on the frames to LED lights on the frames.