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Curry Soda Spices Up Japan's Soft Drink Selection


Curry Soda - the more you drink, the thirstier you get!Curry Soda - the more you drink, the thirstier you get!

Japan has earned its reputation as the land of bizarre drinks but the nation's soft drink companies aren't resting on their laurels. The marketing of not one, but TWO varieties of curry soda shows that when it comes to thirst, there is no worst.




According to CScout Japan, the latest curry soda to sear the throats of the thirsty in Japan is made by Kimura. Just so you don't think this weird flavor is an aberration, Kimura has also created Durian and Strawberry Milk flavored sodas along with Curry in their upscale, oddly named "Cocktess Chanmery" line. Perhaps Kimura is trying for a sexy, French image. For curry soda. Good luck with that.


Wrapping the upper third of the bottle in gold-toned foil provides a dash of luxury, though you wouldn't want to bring ANY of the three to a ritzy dinner or other important social event.

The Chanmery series comes in 360 ml (12 fl oz) bottles and sell for 3,024 yen (about $31) for a 12-bottle case.

From the stereotypical turbaned caricature of an Indian fakir on the label, it seems that Kimura also makes a down-market curry soda as part of their longstanding, popular Ramune carbonated drinks - though whether it will make an appearance in Japan's omnipresent soda vending machines is not yet known. Ramune is one of Japan's iconic brands, famed for its knuckle-breaking glass marble seal.





 

The sweet soda comes in an ever-widening rainbow of flavors including apricot, peach, lychee, green tea, Oolong tea, wasabi and curry - the latter two now available in extra hot and spicy versions respectively. The Spicy Curry Ramune label once again displays our stereotypical swami, now profusely sweating, with his turbaned head turned to the side spewing a wickedly barbed tongue of flame. Yummy!

Speaking of which, it should also be mentioned that Kimura's Ramune line includes "PET" Ramune. I was thinking that it's either made for pets, tastes like pets or is flavored with polyester. See what writing about weird Japanese stuff does to you? Luckily my Lovely Wife provided a translation - PET is plastic; what the bottles are made of. Whew, once again saved by the belle!

You can try some of the Ramune flavors easily in the US through Amazon

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Steve Levenstein
J A P A N O R A M A
InventorSpot.com