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Elegant Toilet Paper Rolls Take Eco-Crafting To Another Level

Yuken Teruya StudioYuken Teruya Studio

 

Yuken Teruya doesn't do it for the environment. He doesn't just do it for politics either. He just takes regular household items that would otherwise be thrown away and he turns them into art for what seems is the love of art.

"But if you find unexpected shapes and colors from the toilet rolls, they become something else. It's not about politics anymore, and you can take out the idea of toilet paper roll to your house" (Yuken Teruya website).

Who is Yuken Teruya? Yuken Teruya is the talented Japanese artist behind the elegant toilet paper roll cut outs you see above. His delicate artwork puts my toilet paper roll kid binoculars to complete and utter shame. I haven't had the chance to show my children the pictures of his artwork yet, but I know that once I do my kids will be mesmerized by Yuken's craft. I can hear them wondering now, "How did he do that?" They would put my boring glued up toilet roll stamped kid binoculars aside and ask me for a pair of scissors. Then they would grab a bunch of toilet papers rolls and begin cutting away until they made a toilet paper roll cut out masterpiece of their own.

Yuken's artwork is not only beautiful it is inspiring. From the moment I saw it I was amazed and pleased that something so beautiful could be made out of something so basic and mundane as a toilet paper roll. It takes recycling and crafting to an entirely new level.

When you visit a craft website or check out a craft book for ideas on what kind of crafts to make with regular household items like toilet paper rolls you are never lead to ideas like these, well...at least not until Yuken Teruya came along.  You are given instructions to make toilet paper roll puppets or binoculars, but not toilet paper roll sculptures.  

Yuken doesn't just work with toilet paper rolls though. He recreates pizza boxes, flags and paper bags too. His paper bag forest series is amazing. The details on the trees are so intricate they almost look real. He doesn't even remove the cut out. The tree in each bag is "created without adding or removing anything, just by cutting out and folding the paper from the bag itself.

To see more of Yuken Teruya's artwork visit his website at Yukenteruyastudio.com.


Via Inhabitat and Yuken Teruya