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Exercise Your Brain And Play With Your Inner Child At The Same Time

Exercising your brain is a great way to enhance your well-being, particularly as you age. With the Color Yourself Smart book series by Thunder Bay Press you can exercise your gray matter while engaging Color Yourself Smart -- Birds of North AmericaColor Yourself Smart -- Birds of North Americayour inner child as you color in the pictures that relate to your subject of study. By tying the movement of coloring with the learning process it can also trigger kinesthetic learning which can help people retain more information.

Engaging in mental training not only enhances the functioning of the brain, but makes changes in the brain structure itself. Metal stimulation is considered one of the best ways to help keep your brain young, along with physical exercise, good nutrition, social support, and stress reduction. 

With the Color Yourself Smart books you can choose to study anatomy, geography, fine art, dinosaurs or the birds of North America. Each book comes stocked with its own set of colored pencils so that you are ready to go as soon as the book is in your hands.

Color Yourself Smart Book Interior -- Masters of Fine ArtColor Yourself Smart Book Interior -- Masters of Fine ArtEach book contains 52 black and white technical illustrations ready for you to color as you explore each different subject. 

Randii Opsahl, 72, of Boulder, Colorado, recently purchased two of the books, the one on anatomy and the one on art, with an eye toward exercising her brain. She is interested in using kinesthetic learning to help keep her mind young and active as she continues her senior journey. Opsahl, like many adults, finds a return to the days of coloring relaxing as well. Relaxation is another key to keeping the mind young and active.

She is also interested into delving into Thunder Bay Press's sister books -- Doodle Yourself Smart. These books cover geometry, math, and physics.

To order Color Yourself Smart books, click here.

Sources: The New York Times, Thunder Bay Press, Randi Opsahl