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Fashionably Scientific Butterfly Dress

I really like it when someone puts on his or her thinking hats to create fashion with an edge, a scientific edge. In my book, that's what really makes it innovative fashion.

So when I came across the Butterfly Dress, I was floored.

The dress has been designed by Alex Reeder, a grad student at NYU, who's working on changing the way we think about and approach clothes.

He says that any time we go out; we start by planning to what to wear. The decision depends on the destination, prospective partner(s) for the evening, and how to best present oneself, to capture the attention of people across the room?

Wouldn't it be great if clothes could function as an ice-breaker and literally invite a conversation - or better yet - instigate one?

The Butterfly Dress is just that. The Dress is aware of its surroundings in two ways: first, the distance of people around it, and secondly, the heartbeat of the wearer. This data is used to control the flapping and vertical motion of golden butterflies attached to the surface of the dress. As someone approaches you, the butterflies rise in greeting. The magic is in the motion. The butterflies also beat in tandem to the wearers heartbeats.

Not something to wear on a first date...

Though right now the dress is pretty formal, a beautiful creation in silk and organza, much like a wedding gown, Alex is working on more informal versions.

Says the creator, ‘the Butterfly Dress is an exploration of fashion, interactivity and sociality. The dress itself is light and does not sacrifice form for function. The battery and butterflies are removable, making the dress washable - essential for wearability. The butterflies are attached modularly, allowing mood and situation to influence the personalization - and visual appearance of the dress.'

All I can say is that it's a very wearable style that incorporates science, technology, and fashion. Really got me thinking on how we interact with the world around us.

Check out the way the dress moves here.

Via: fashionista.com

Aditi Simlai Tiwari
Innovative Fashions Writer
InventorSpot.com