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Fruits & Veggies Are Just Not That Popular

 

Health experts say we just have to eat more fruits & vegetables: image via fitkidspdx.comHealth experts say we just have to eat more fruits & vegetables: image via fitkidspdx.com Twenty-one First Ladies, including Michelle Obama, have pushed healthy diets as their main projects. I guess they should have found different causes to get behind, because in spite of their efforts, the efforts of the medical community, the insurance industry, the health and fitness industry and many more sectors of the economy... we keep eating fewer and fewer of them.

Who wants fruits and vegetables when you can eat potatoes fried 27 ways?

Information is in your face daily about the health and fitness benefits of eating fruits and vegetables, but just the other day, a 10-year study released by the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) shows that we (American adults) are eating even less of the healthy stuff than we were 10 years ago!  Not surprising, because the rates of obesity and diabetes have climbed in that period as well.

The CDC Healthy People 2010 objectives included targets of fruit and vegetable consumption. Their targets were high indeed, compared to the results.

The CDC 2010 target for adults (18 or over) was that 75% of the people responding to the 2009 survey would eat two or more fruits a day. But  the actual responses showed that only 32.5%, nationwide, ate two or more fruits per day.

Disappointing too, were the results of vegetable consumption. The 2010 target for adults who eat three or more portions of vegetables a day (not including french fries) was 50% of the population; the actual respondents who ate that amount of vegetables was only 26.3% nationwide. 

In the map below, you can see the breakdown by state:

 

Adult Fruit & Vegetable Consumption by State, from 2010 CDC report: image via zoominlocal.comAdult Fruit & Vegetable Consumption by State, from 2010 CDC report: image via zoominlocal.com

 

The CDC concludes that...

These findings underscore the need for interventions at national, state, and community levels, across multiple settings (e.g., worksites, community venues, and restaurants) to improve fruit and vegetable access, availability, and affordability, as a means of increasing individual consumption.

In addition to the negative impact on our heath, interesting too, is the impact of less demand for fruit and veggies on the nation's farmers, as well as other economies in the chain of food gathering, transportation, sale and preparation that rely on that demand for survival.

For more information on the CDC study, read its complete report here.

 

CDC via NYTimes