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Logicool Washable Keyboard Rinses Clean After Sloppy Spills


So those pretzels are making you thirsty and your crumb-covered fingers just can't get a grip on that sweating bottle of bubbly – no problem! Messy spills don't chill the Logicool model k310 washable keyboard. Like a phoenix rising from the ashes, this cleverly constructed peripheral rises from the dishes so you can type again.

Logicool designed the k310 to last whether it's merely used, sloppily abused or both. The keyboard is rated for 5 million keystrokes if you're counting, which you aren't but someone at Logicool was. In a tough economy, a tough job's still a job amiright?





Anyway, the k310 is a good-looking beast featuring ivory white keys on a matte black background. You probably won't turn it over in normal use but just in case you do, a pleasing blue expanse of plastic covers the keyboard's backside.

While we're on the flipside, a couple of things: two fold-out feet allow for users to set the keyboard flat or with the top edge slightly raised, and a small cleaning brush (also rendered in matching blue plastic is affixed to the base – nice touch, that!





The Logicool k310's most redeeming feature is it's main one: get it dirty and it washes clean. Unplug the included USB connector first, then haul the k310 over to the nearest sink & faucet combo.

Between the gently flowing water and any required brush action, most types of offending dirt and grime should be swept down the drain. If only they had these at Three Mile Island!





The Logicool k310 washable keyboard is priced at 3,480 yen or somewhere in the low $40 range depending on the current yen-dollar exchange rate. The keys are marked in both English and Japanese characters so whichever country you're from, go ahead and give it a dry... er, a try! (via Gigazine)

Update: You can buy the Logicool washable keyboard now in the U.S. at sites like Amazon here.

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Steve Levenstein
J A P A N O R A M A
InventorSpot.com