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Make Love Not Babies With Latest IUD Birth Control Device

Are you still looking for the perfect birth-control solution? I know I am. After my recent article on the Female Condoms comeback, no pun intended, I was alerted to a parallel upsurge in popularity of the IUD.

An IUD is an intrauterine device, a small t-shaped flexible piece of plastic, that is inserted into your uterus to prevent pregnancy. The first official IUD was invented in the 1920's, (you can read more about the history of the IUD here) although people have been putting things into the uterus to try to prevent pregnancy for longer than we can remember. 

Skyla IUDSkyla IUD

I always associated IUD's with infection and pain. I also assumed they could only be implanted after you have a baby, but it seems the newest Skyla IUD is designed for women who haven't had children. It's smaller so it's intended to cause less pain, and more appropriate for us females with smaller uteruses, or so they say. 

It's also more affordable now. What used to cost $500-$1000 is being covered by the Affordable Care Act's birth-control provision in the US (with some caveats).

Insertion problems are also going away: if the device isn't inserted properly, it can cause cramping, spotting and pain so companies like Bioceptive are developing an Inserter that should be available in 2015 to ease the insertion process. 

I want to try one. I do. They are 99% effective in preventing pregnancy and can last for up to 12 years (or 3 years with the Skyla IUD). But IUD's are still in severe lawsuits. 300 Mirena IUD lawsuits have been filed by women who allegedly suffered "uterine perforations, infertility and organ damage, when the IUD spontaneously migrated from its proper position in the uterus, despite having been correctly inserted by a healthcare provider." [1]

That's really bad press. I can't imagine female condoms ever facing the same issues. If we were to put them up against each other, I think there's a clear winner here. At least until they can guarantee the insertion method is foolproof.

What do you think? Wouldn't you prefer to use female condoms and keep your uterus happy?

[1] http://www.prweb.com/releases/mirena-iud-lawsuit/mirena-lawsuit/prweb11450625.htm

Ellen Dudley
Medical Technology and Health Apps
InventorSpot.com