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Ooho: Drink Your Water, Eat Your Water Bottle!

 

Ooho. Who would have thought it?  Three London-based design students came up with Ooho, a water container that's not plastic, not vinyl, not stainless steel... but an edible algae! Ooho was considered so brilliant that, among other coveted awards, it won the 2014 Lexus Design Award.

 

Ooho, edible water container: image via lexus-int.comOoho, edible water container: image via lexus-int.com

 

Ooho, edible water container: image via designboom.comOoho, edible water container: image via designboom.com

 

The three inventors, Rodrigo García Gonzalez, Pierre Pasalier, and Guillaume Couche, were inspired by water droplets, those self-contained tiny blobs of water that can jiggle in the wind, but not be easily broken. Then there's the egg yolk, another nature-encased liquid form, and caviar... that's also encased in a natural membrane.

The man-made version of the egg yolk membrane was first patented in 1946 by an Englishman, William Julius Syplie Peschardt, whose British patent was supported by a U.S. Patent - US 240357A. Peschardt used his patent to manufacture a membrane for an artificial cherry to be cooked in pies, but his patent covered other items, even an encasement of liquid rubber.

In the 90's, a Spanish chef named Ferràn Adria modernized food spherification, bringing about a culinaray revolution in molecular foods, creating droplets out of everything from juices to liquified duck, with spheres composed of a variety of edible materials. WikiPearls, made by WikiFoods in Paris, are becoming very popular portable and deliciously potable food spheres.

As for Ooho, its double-walled sphere is made from brown algae and calcium chloride.  Yes, it can be eaten, but it's biodegradable anyway.  It costs less than two cents to make.  Watch how it works....


 

You know the best part of the Ooho invention?  You can make the containers yourself! As the Ooho inventors say, they've not only created a DIY but a CIY (Cook It Yourself)!


Sources: DesignBoom, PhysOrg, psfk, WikiPearl