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Panasonic Unveils 3D HD Television System

Last month, Panasonic announced its plans to bring 3D HD technology to the home consumer next year. Though it's not quite ready for market yet, Panasonic has taken the next step and unveiled a 3D HD system that includes a 50-inch plasma display and an accompanying pair of active shutter glasses that combine to create a 3D 1080p picture.

 

In order to provide the viewer with a 3D experience, the television alternates between left and right images. Each 1080p frame is displayed at a rate of 60 frames per second. The battery-powered glasses themselves serve to merge the eye-specific images into one, fluid 3D experience--similar to how the brain merges images from each eye to create a three dimensional visual.

To keep the picture bright and movement smooth, Panasonic has used its high-speed 3D drive technology, which allows for rapid illumination of pixels needed for the 3D display. The display also makes use of new short-luminescence-decay phospers that prevent images from lingering on the screen for too long after the frame has changed. 

Panasonic unveiled the prototype at its headquarters in Osaka, Japan on Monday and intends to show the system at the CEATEC Japan show that begins next week. Panasonic is expecting to have a model hit the market next year, but no further information on specific dates or pricing has been offered at the moment. 

Sony is also developing a 3D HDTV system and both companies are working with the Blu-ray Disc Association toward developing a standard for 3D compatibility encoded onto Blu-ray Discs. Sony's system is also expected to hit the market next year.

Check out the following video to get a better idea of what Panasonic's system offers:

 

For more info, check out Panasonic's 3D website.  

What do you think? Are you excited for the opportunity to view and purchase 3D HDTV or would you prefer to stick with the television you're using now? 

 Via: Electronista, IT World and Dvice 

Comments
Sep 28, 2009
by Anonymous

Apps for

Education
Planning
Product Demos
Marketing
Tourisim
Science studies
Theme park Ride
Demos
at Malls
in Hotels IE tour the area via 3D then choose Tour route.
Medical studies
Surgery.

Replace IMAX?

Home IMAX?

Problem:
battery charge glasses (lose juice) during show?
battery weight in glasses?
battery costs
& TV system cost.

Love to see Live Demo.

Id PR this on
Science Channel
E! TV
TCM
IFC
Planet Green
NFL Channel
Spice TV?

Wow.

Darn entry price as New Tech

Love to trade in set for this.

Problem 2:
Programming NOT geared to 3D like HD for todays TVs.

Oct 28, 2009
by Anonymous

video display

i developed a video display that display video on to what seems like thin air (floating effect). this device does not require LED or LCD substrate. operates in or outdoors,it is not a projected image. imagine what this would do for the advertising industry. the video display is not confined with in the boarders of a conventional display screen.daveanne@shaw.ca

Oct 28, 2009
by Anonymous

video display

daveanne@shaw.ca i developed a video display that display video on to what seems like thin air(floating effect). this device does not require LED or LCD subsrate. operates in or out doors. it is not a projected image. imagine what this would do for the advertising industry. the video is not confined with in the boarders of a conventional display screen daveanne@shaw.ca sorry about this extra comment i did not get my email address correct in the last comment.