RipCord Packaging Tape Makes Opening Packages A Breeze

 RipCord Packaging Tape: YouTube screen shot of RipCord tapeRipCord Packaging Tape: YouTube screen shot of RipCord tape

 

How many times have you tried opening a taped package where you quickly gave up and resorted to using a knife to practically hack it open? If you're like the rest of us, probably a lot. Well, some genius has changed all that with packaging tape with a rip cord built in so all you have to do is pull the thread in order to get to the goods inside the box. It's about darn time!

Innovation

The thread itself works similarly to the pull strands on packs of cigarettes, but it's more like a thread of unwaxed dental floss rather than just another strip of cellophane. The dispenser that holds the tape automatically creates a convenient little tab for you when you cut the tape to size, making it easy to access the cord. Otherwise, you'd probably still resort to hacking away at it, regardless of the nifty cord. Tape like this would be a blessing to people with hand and wrist pain.

Inventions

So who is this genius? Apparently, the inventor of the rip cord tape is an individual named Jay Andress of Cincinnati, Ohio. It's unclear yet whether he's sold his brilliant yet simple idea to some major brand like Scotch or Duck yet, but surely they're looking into it or at the very least replicating the idea. And it's actually not a new idea at that. Andress submitted the idea for the invention a few years ago, but it didn't seem to go anywhere at first other than garner loads of praise for being such a cool new idea.

Inventor News

When you think about it, it's actually pretty sad that we, as humans, get worked up by the simplest things like this. But when inventions like this come along to make our lives easier, not just better, we seem to get pretty excited. You could kind of compare it to sliced bread: the product has been there all along; it just took somebody to modify it for convenience sake that makes it so noteworthy.

 

RipCord Packaging Tape: Shorr Packaging CompanyRipCord Packaging Tape: Shorr Packaging Company

 

Packaging Tape

After a bit of digging, it appears that a small group known as Intertape Polymer Group (IPG) has picked up on the design and is currently in the works to market the product as RipCord, the Knife-Free Solution to Safely Opening Packages. So far, this is their spiel on the product: "RipCord™ is a new, innovative, tape head technology from IPG. This all-in-one carton sealing solution protects your contents and prevents package opening injuries. The specially-designed RipCord™ is applied directly in line with the tape during the carton sealing process. The highly-visible cord tab is easily lifted and pulled across the taped seam to quickly and safely access the package. No sharp blades are needed to open cartons sealed with RipCord™—safeguarding both the package handler and boxed items." They've also created a YouTube video that you can view below demonstrating how easy peasy the oh, so brilliant product is.

Christmas Packages

Tape like this would be a godsend at the holidays, when you're knee deep in boxes, Styrofoam peanuts and seemingly endless reels of sub-par packing tape equipped with cruddy serrated cutters that don't work worth a — well, you get the point. RipCord is said to be easy to use with great sticking power, and the cutting device is supposed to be second to none. Additionally, and perhaps more importantly, the folks on the receiving end of your Christmas presents will thank you. Actually, when you think about it, it's a gift in itself to be able to get into a package so swiftly.

RipCord Info

While the press release (which can be found in PDF form on Google) in connection to this invention dates back to August of 2014 and specifies IPG as the group behind it, the YouTube video directs consumers to Shorr Packaging specialists for information on the product. This is a little bit confusing, but it does suggest it's at least in production. No matter who makes it, it really could be the greatest thing since sliced bread — at least in the packaging and shipping industry.