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Scary Street Art for the Unsuspecting Public

Mark Jenkins is an American artist specializing in street installations. He has created many projects and is mostly known for his work created with clear packing tape.

He makes items such as babies, small children, adults and animals. He then places them out in the public, usually on busy streets. This is usually when unsuspecting people pass by, wondering what they are looking at.

His work seems to be mostly displayed in New York, Los Angeles and Washington, D.C.

A few of his projects include:

Embed Series: Life-sized tape people are dressed in realistic clothing and installed around various cities – such as being stuffed into a traffic cone, trash bag or can. Jenkins then documents through video the reaction of the public as they pass by his sculptures.




Tape Men, where casts were made from his body using clear packing tape in which he placed in the streets of Rio de Janeiro.

 

Meterpops: Jenkins put transparent lollipop heads on parking meters in Washington DC.

MeterpopMeterpop

 

Storker Project: Tape babies are “dropped” in various environments as part of a “species propagation movement.” He’s placed babies on billboards, stop signs and in trash cans.

As for an explanation of the Storker Project: “The Storker Project is a species propagation movement by STORKER seeking to incite select individuals from the public at large, perhaps you. If while passing by one you feel strange sensations in your nipples or fingertips, adopt the infant, breast feed, and give it plenty of TLC. It will gradually mature to a full size Tape Man or Woman to co-habitate with you and eventually take you to the Glazed Paradise (or possibly oust you from your home).”

Jenkins was asked by The Morning News how long his pieces usually last out in the public.

“This varies greatly. Some pieces that I thought would be gone in hours lasted for weeks, and vice-versa. Some are taken by pedestrians; some by city cleanup crews. If I can get a piece well out of arm’s reach, it can last for quite awhile, and a few of my pieces are still up. I think a plastic bottle takes about a thousand years to decompose. I’m not sure what a tape man’s outdoor lifespan would be. Probably less.”

 

This is my kind of artist. One that likes to pull pranks on unsuspecting people. Whoever said that art shouldn't be fun was a big liar. I think there should be more artists out there using art to scare the public.

 

Source: Mark Jenkins' site

Diana Eid
Innovative Arts
InventorSpot.com

Comments
Jun 9, 2008
by Anonymous

Dis...

Most of those should be taken away because they are a distraction. Time wasting and potentially dangerous distractions for people driving by.

Jun 11, 2008
by Anonymous

wrong

I REALLY hate to break it to you, but there's no way the pictures you posted of the "tape men" series were in Rio de Janeiro. For one, the street sign is an American-styled sign in English. In the second picture, the phone booth looks nothing like the distinctive blue bubble design of every phone booth I remember seeing in Rio. And snow in the third picture?!?!