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Sustainsia Makes Working From Home Even Greener

Sustainsia, Inc's Home WorkstationSustainsia, Inc's Home Workstation

Working from home is a great way to decrease your carbon footprint, but this new workstation truly keeps it green.  Sustainsia, Inc has paired with Briggs Group Architecture to present their latest innovation in environmentally friendly home workspaces.  Furniture designer, Tony Carr, teamed up with architect, Thomas Briggs, to develop this energy efficient workstation.  Reminiscent of a 1960's teardrop-style camper, these cozy home offices  leave the smallest carbon footprint possible by taking at-home workstations to the next level.

Sustainsia's website boasts "fine craftsmanship, modular design, and curvy construction," claiming their mission is to provide eco-friendly buildings with style.   Features, which are integrated directly into the workspace itself, include a bench which doubles as a futon bed and overhead, lift-open cabinets.  Buyers can opt to add a  "Murphy Table" unit, inspired by tables frequently found in sailboats.  This table unit folds out of the wall and is large enough to be used as a conference or dining table.

The workstations are customizable to include buyers' preferences of color and various accouterments so that the unit will coordinate with the rest of their property.  Interior wood paneling for floor and wall options include Philippine Mahogany, African Mahogany, birch, zebrawood, and more.  Placement of outlets, lighting, and wiring are customizable as well.  Internet connection can be provided, but a wireless connection from the owner's home is usually strong enough to reach the office.  

What makes the workstation so green?  Rooftop solar panels power the entire station, which is also entirely insulated with eco-friendly materials.  These curvy little pods provide a natural, back-to-basics work environment ideal for telecommuters to focus on projects and productivity. According to East Bay Express, pricing begins at around $10,000.  Now, telecommuters will be able to say they "walk to work."

 
Sources: JetsonGreen.com and Sustainsia.com 

 

Amanda Hinski
Environmental Innovations Blogger
InventorSpot.com