Tesla + Telstra = Free Internet Connectivity In Every Car


Have free internet, will travel... if you're a Tesla Model S owner in Australia, at least. Tesla Motors and Telstra, Australia's largest telecommunications and media company, have partnered to bring free internet connectivity to each and every Tesla Model S sold down under.

Tesla opened their first Australian dealership in Sydney in 2010 but high demand for the company's signature Model S grand touring sedan in North America and Europe delayed delivery of ordered vehicles to customers until the fall of 2014. In the meantime, Aussies eager to own a Model S could only plunk down a $6,000 deposit and wait... and wait some more.




With the Model S finally appearing on the Sydney dealer's showroom floor, customers who pick up their long-awaited purchases are finding a very welcome bonus built right in courtesy of Telstra.

It's not that Model S owners can do without internet connectivity – it's essential considering the car's digital dashboard and center console won't work without it. The latter features a 17-inch tablet that controls the HVAC system, musical entertainment options, GPS functionality, even the height-adjustable suspension. Software and firmware updates can also be managed online.




All well and good but that kind of near-constant connectivity can seriously affect the contents of one's wallet. That's where the Tesla-Telstra connection really pays off – literally. Besides being free, the partnership benefits owners in a number of ways.

Being a very large telecommunications carrier, Telstra's 3G service covers the vast majority of Australia's road network meaning anywhere a Model S driver drives, they'll enjoy internet radio and in-built Google Maps. In addition, a special app allows drivers access to remote functions such as locking and unlocking doors; remote starting, and activating the AC to proactively cool the car. Last but not least, in the event your Tesla suffers some sort of electronic glitch in transit, a quick call to the dealer allows Tesla techies to perform a remote diagnosis and in some cases, even facilitate a repair. Cool... er, crikey! (via News Corp Australia)