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Tom Kollars' Invention May Save Millions Of Lives: ProVector

The invention of ProVector-Bt could not be more timely. As rising temperatures worldwide result in greater numbers of parasites active for longer periods each year, mosquitoes and other disease transmitters are contributing to higher death rates from disease-carrying pests. This is especially true for malaria and dengue fever, now claiming 5 million and 50 million new victims a year respectively.

Tom Kollars, director of the Biodefense and Infectious Disease Laboratory at Georgia Southern's Jiann-Ping Hsu College of Public Health, has devoted the last ten years of his life to finding a solution to reduce these and other mosquito born illnesses, like West Nile disease. His inventions, the ProVector Bt and the ProVector M, have been tested in many tropical and sub-tropical regions of the world, and have proven to be highly effective at reducing mosquito populations in their immediate areas. In blind trials conducted at Walter Reed Army Institute of Overseas Research, the ProVector killed 50 to 100 percent of mosquitoes within just a few days.

 

 

The ProVector is a small plastic flower made of a high-impact plastic covered in quadrants with red, blue, green, and gold decals, employing the colors that attract different kinds of mosquitoes. Beneath the feeding screens in the petals of the flowers, the sweet artificial nectar attracts them further and when they ingest the nectar they take in a good dose of Bacillus thurengiensis (Bt) and then die. According to Georgia Southern University, this is the first success ever in getting mature mosquitoes to feed on Bt.

"We trick the mosquitoes into coming right to it and eating it," Kollars says of the Bt. "This is a very environmentally-friendly apparatus that uses a safe biopesticide, so it can be safely used in the home. No pesticides are sprayed into the environment."

To make the ProVector more environmentally friendly, the screens are designed so that only a mosquito's mouth parts can fit into the holes; therefore, any other insects or birds lured to the ProVector will not be able to access the nectar.

ProVector M, the second model of the ProVector, kills only the malaria parasite within the mosquito and not the mosquito, leaving the mosquito to carry out its ecological function without infecting humans.

The best news is that after 10 years, Dr. Kollars will see his now-patented invention manufactured and marketed by his licensee, Medical Infusions Technologies, Inc. this year. Good news for him and great news for the world. Let's hope he continues his research along this same path, reducing the impact of disease carriers on human and animal lives.

 

 

Comments
Mar 28, 2009
by Anonymous

Wow

That's a pretty great invention. I'm wondering if it will attract harmless insects too though?

Mar 28, 2009
by Myra Per-Lee

harmless insects... response

Dr. Kollars designed the holes in the screen specifically for the mosquito's "mouth" parts, to avoid harming other insects So, to respond, he's probably done the best he could.  Also, there were no reports from the many tests in the field that other insects were being harmed.  Thanks for writing!

Jun 3, 2009
by Anonymous

Where to purchase?

Hello...Could you please tell me where I can purchase on of these?

Thank you kindly,

Jun 6, 2009
by Anonymous

Where to order..and How?

HI,

This is one of the most important invention, not driven by money but by service to fellow human beings.

I happen to be one of the people who have been tortured by mosquitoes..and i am still afraid of them. Although I live in UK, I more than interested in knowing how one can get them and send them over to my country in Africa.

It would make a huge huge difference.

Andy K

Jun 7, 2009
by Anonymous

How do we purchase them?

Hi, I work as a volunteer in a slum area in Nairobi. We work with many families there and this sounds great!!! I also heard someone say that they're trying to create jobs for poor people too. Please send me more information. This would be a brilliant way to help our friends help themselves and others :)
Thanks
Christine