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Upwalk Anti-Stumble Socks Help Keep Senior Citizens On Their Feet


Upwalk anti-stumble socks from Japan's Terumo Corporation are designed to help senior citizens avoid tripping over different kinds of household flooring surfaces. The socks feature a specialized sewing technique that creates a pulling sensation on the front of the foot. Elderly wearers find the resulting toes-up posture shifts their center of gravity back to their heels, helping them to avoid stubbing their toes and falling forward.

The problem of stumbling at home is more commonplace in Japanese homes where wall-to-wall carpeting favored in Western homes is infrequently seen. Instead, the typical Japanese home or apartment may have a number of different flooring surfaces including straw tatami mats, area rugs, polished hardwood, vinyl linoleum and more. 




The places where these different flooring materials meet are a potential danger zone that becomes more dangerous as people age: according to Terumo's product page, “ those in their twilight years... are four times more likely to stumble due to reduced muscle strength.” Check out this video from Terumo Corporation's Upwalk product page that illustrates the problem, the consequences and their solution.

Upwalk anti-stumble socks address this issue by virtue of the way they're sewn. Tightly-woven panels on the sock's upper surface and in the back, covering the Achilles Tendon area, stretch less than the rest of the sock's material. This creates tension across the top of the wearer's feet, pulling the toes upward and shifting the balance point back towards the heels.

People wearing Upwalk anti-stumble socks not only find they're stubbing their toes less often, when they do the result is they tumble forward into an injurious situation. Terumo Corporation offers Upwalk anti-stumble socks in a range of five progressing sizes and three pleasant colors: gray, black, and pink. They're available through White Rabbit Express priced at 1,980 yen (about $20) per pair.

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Steve Levenstein
J A P A N O R A M A
InventorSpot.com