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USB Tie Pin Fan Cooler Chills Overheated Mad Men (& Women)


The USB Tie Pin Cooler from Japan's Thanko takes Mad Men style to a newer, cooler level. The lightweight, high-power clip-on fan normally runs off a wired USB connection but includes a battery pack so you can keep chillin' out when you have to leave the office.

Unlike Thanko's previous efforts in the wearable personal cooling field (the USB necktie and USB Neck Cooler come to mind), the USB Tie Pin Cooler is compact, discrete, and doesn't make you look like a futuristic nerd. It's also a lot less creepy than Thanko's USB Shoe Cooler, not to mention being light-years less disturbing.

Being discrete is one thing, using that attribute to boost functionality is another and in this respect the USB Tie Pin Cooler scores a bullseye.

The unit's mechanical heart – the compact fan unit – rests inside the user's shirt just over the user's organic heart. We're sure those with implanted pacemakers will have no concerns about using the item but as always, let caveat emptor be your guide.

Setting up the USB Tie Pin Cooler is as easy as pie. Simply use the ordinary-looking metal tie clip to secure any type of necktie in place with the 28-gram (one ounce) fan unit it's attached to sliding inside the wearer's shirt, out of sight and presumably out of mind. Attach it to your PC, laptop or tablet via the included USB connector cord or go mobile using the included 3AA-battery porto-power-pack.

The fan runs virtually silently, enabling a steady stream of cool air to gently waft throughout the confines of the wearer's shirt or blouse. OK, the thought of that does seem a bit on the odd side but it still doesn't hold a candle to the USB Shoe Cooler.

Thanko has the USB Tie Pin Cooler listed at 2,480 yen (about $25) at their online product page. Those who'd rather purchase via an English-language selling site are advised to check it out at White Rabbit Express.

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Steve Levenstein
J A P A N O R A M A
InventorSpot.com