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Wacky Wax 'Candelier' is one Wick-edly Clever Lamp Design


“Candelier” is a chimaeric art object whose form and function approximates one thing (a chandelier) while being composed of another (candles). While it's true that the chandelier predates electric lighting, the Candelier as interpreted by Takeshi Miyakawa takes the original concept of the chandelier and gives it a twist... and a wicked one at that.

In essence, the Candelier is a complex candle that is its own holder. Light all 12 wicks and an 18th century onlooker would note nothing amiss. As time passed and the “candles” began to burn down, however, our Georgian guest's anxiety level would likely rise in turn. Who can imagine what his or her reaction might be by the time every candle had exhausted its wax and the formerly beautiful hanging chandelier had been reduced to a warm, congealed puddle of wax on the floor?





Miyakawa created the Candelier in response to a challenge from Nova Jiang, creator of a computer program called “The Creatomatic”. “It works by randomly juxtaposing diagrams of two everyday objects from a selection of hundreds,” according to Jiang.

“Through free association, the two objects can prompt the invention of an entirely new object, which can be practical or nonsensical.” My money's on the latter, if the “Hammer Rack” (a rack for hammers, made out of hammers) and “Tabulb” (a table supported by four light bulbs) are any indication.





Impractical or not, the Candelier is anything but a joke. Miyakawa spent 10 weeks turning the Candelier's concept into reality. Consider that the Candelier is a one-off design completely constructed from custom-made parts that must be hand made. Even the molds for the wax structural components are unique, as there isn't much call for wax chandeliers in these (or any) parts.

The Candelier and other art pieces created via “The Creatomatic” may be viewed at the Eyebeam Gallery in New York City from November 29th through December 18th, 2011. Just don't view it from directly below, or you may become a permanent exhibit yourself. Wax off! (via Spoon and Tamago)

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Steve Levenstein
J A P A N O R A M A
InventorSpot.com