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Want To House The Homeless Behind Billboards?

The problem of people being homeless is ubiquitous around the world. A small design firm in Slovakia has come up with an idea to house these people in a small, but humane and dignified way. Design Develop, the design firm, has created what they are calling "Project Gregory." The idea behind the project is to use adjacent billboards to create simple, small homes for the homeless.

Billboad Living Unit for the Homeless (Image via Bored Panda)Billboad Living Unit for the Homeless (Image via Bored Panda)

The billboards, angled to face each direction on a highway, create a small triangle of unused space that the designers have envisioned turning into tiny living units that would only be about 59 square feet in size. They would provide a bed, a small bathroom with a shower, kitchen, and storage for personal effects.

The apartments are designed with clean, modern lines, and have plain light wood and white laminates. The bed is elevated to allow for storage room underneath the bed, as well as the steps leading up to the bed. Each unit would also have windows that would face away from the highway.

Billboad Living Unit for the Homeless (Image via Bored Panda)Billboad Living Unit for the Homeless (Image via Bored Panda)

Part of the viability of this project comes from the fact that the placement of the billboards go along the lines of the power and water grids. This means minimal work to access these for water and electrical hook ups. The tiny apartments would be paid for by the advertising posted on the billboards.

The photos here are just a digital representation of what the apartments would look like. The project does not currently have the funding to start building anything and the designers are hoping that someone with deep pockets will come forward and help them make their dream come true.

Billboad Living Unit for the Homeless (Image via Bored Panda)Billboad Living Unit for the Homeless (Image via Bored Panda)

Naturally, it is unknown as to how well a project like this would work. There is also no mention of how these living units would be managed and distributed. Would these apartments be used as a part of a program to help these people get back on their feet again? Or would this become a permanent way of life for some people? And what of dishes and linens -- the sort of things that homeless people would not have available?

However these questions end up being answered, it still seems like a good idea. Everyone deserves a decent home, no matter how small.

Sources: The Guardian, Business Insider, Bored Panda