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What Will Recovery Look Like? An International Call For Ideas From Designers And Architects

 

The Imagining Recovery project is inviting architects and other designers from all over the world to submit their ideas about what recovery will look like. The competition is being sponsored by designers and students of the Global Public Policy Network (GPPN), a network of prestigious policy schools around the world.

The concept of design and public policy coming together to plan the future may be foreign to some, but never before has there been the necessity for this pairing, and as the GPPN notes, "This moment of change offers an opportunity for designers to rethink their role in our society."

The GPPN held an ongoing dialog with designers interested in competing from March 5 - 15, 2009 so that the policy makers could share and discuss their facts and figures with the designers. During that time, the designers were each paired with a policy maker to work on a submission together.

The designer's part in the contest submission is to communicate to the public what recovery will look like and enable the public to visualize the process by which we get from global recession to recovery. Designers may use any visual form to express their strategy, including drawings, 3-dimensional objects, technical applications, user interfaces, or campaigns to affect social perceptions and behaviors. (See submission requirements.)

April 29, 2009 will be President Obama's 100th day in office and it is also the deadline for submissions. After winners have been selected by a panel of international design and public policy notables, there will be a world-wide tour including at least six of the winning designs and presentation. Also they will all be available on the web at ImaginingRecovery.com. You will find everything you need to know about entering the competition, the background, sponsors, and developments on this site.

ImaginingRecovery.com, Sipa/Columbia, The Morningside Post, via BDonline.

Photo: Come A Little Closer, designed by Nina Farkache for Droog Design