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Which Kids Are Most Likely To Be Teased By Their Peers?

Drawing by Krista-Louise, presented at Kaleidoscope Children's Theatre, Rhode Island in 2010: image via kaleidoscopechildrenstheatre.comDrawing by Krista-Louise, presented at Kaleidoscope Children's Theatre, Rhode Island in 2010: image via kaleidoscopechildrenstheatre.com Kids with any trait that's not the norm often get teased or mocked by other children.  It's an unfortunate fact of life.  But a new study conducted by psychologists at Kansas State University had some surprising results regarding which children are most likely to be chided by their peers.

The group of doctorate students in psychology, headed by their professor, Mark Barnett, looked specifically at the role of 'fault attribution' in peer evaluation and drew up descriptions of six males: a poor student, poor athlete, an extremely overweight child, extremely aggressive child, extremely shy child, and a child with symptoms of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder.

They created statements supposedly made by the six peers during an interview, in which each child described his 'problem' and if he desired to fix it. A second group of statements were also contrived as a follow up to the first set, here the students supposedly reporting on their progress six months later.

The psychologists shared the statements with 137 test subjects from third through eighth grade, asking them tor rate various feelings toward the each of the six peers on a 5-point scale.  Results revealed a strong pattern in their feelings toward each peer, largely based on two factors: blame and effort.

The children were more likely to make fun of the overweight and aggressive peers and those who did not make the effort to correct their deficiencies.  

"Attributions of fault seem to be very important in childrens' attitudes and anticipated reactions to peers with undesirable characteristics," Barnett said. "The more they attribute fault to peers for being a poor student, a poor athlete or whatever, the more they dislike them and the more they anticipate responding to them in a negative manner."

"If the students think that the child has tried to change, that tends to positively influence how they anticipate interacting with that peer," Barnett said. "They really liked kids who are successful in overcoming their problem, but they also really liked kids who tried and put effort into changing."

Though the girls were generally kinder than the boy subjects in this study, they were not kinder when it came to their reactions to overweight and agressiveness.  Both the boys and girls considered peers with these characteristics to be at fault.

 

source: HealthCanal

 

 

Comments
Oct 12, 2011
by Anonymous

Anti

I am anti Bullying. Sucks

Oct 12, 2011
by Anonymous

Anti

what really sucks is that picture - like a bad police sketch, only creepy and clowny

Oct 12, 2011
by Anonymous

Hmmm

That picture reminds me of all the girls I've tied up in my basement....