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WiFi Dowsing Rod Finds Signal Instead of Water

Ever used a dowsing rod?  I have.  Only in my case there were two rods, each made of metal wire.

At first I approached it as a joke.  A friend of mine had made these and swore by them.  We were in his back yard.  He handed me the rods and asked me to walk around the yard, insisting that the rods would cross each other to form an "X" when I stepped over any water source.  Having no knowledge of where any of the house's water lines were, I set out slowly walking across the yard.

I was readying a response for making me feel like an idiot when the rods, held lightly in my hands, crossed to form an "X."  My friend laughed and told me I was standing right on top of his house's incoming water line.

Still not convinced, I took the rods to my house.  They worked.  Not just as a fluke.  There was a 100% success rate with these things.

I state this only to point out that there's something to utilizing older technology every now-and-then.  Or, if not specifically using that technology, emulating the look and feel of it to make people more comfortable in this rapidly developing technological era.

Some people (myself included) find it difficult to keep up with all of the high-tech advances being so rapidly developed these days.  And we need a little glimpse at the past to help put things in perspective.

This WiFi Dowsing Rod, developed by Mike Thompson, is a great example.  Sure it's sort'a silly and impractical.  But it's a good idea.

Dowsing rods have been utilized as tools for divination in folk magic since the early 19th century.  As such, they are comfortable representations of items that are recognizable to many.

In this case, the dowsing rod detects WiFi signal strength instead of water.  Little lights on the top indicate the optimal signal area for you to set up your laptop.  That's it.  Pure and simple.

Given the shape of this item, I do have to wonder if it is a multi-tasker capable of detecting water as well...

SOURCES: Next Nature, Wikipedia

Comments
Dec 16, 2009
by Anonymous

Cool, I want it!

Cool, I want it!