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Recycled Bike Art Is Going To The Dogs....

There is no right and wrong when creating original art, and for Israeli artist Nirit Levav, inspiration came in the form of discarded bike chains and man's best friend. Her life-size dog sculptures are examples of upcycling at it's finest and most creative. 

Making a Splash: Spectacular Liquid Drop Art

The rise of digital technology has expanded the range of visual art to unimaginable levels in recent years. Without ultra-sensitive photography, the mind-blowing organic forms of Corrie White's liquid drop art would be impossible. Luckily, the combination of creativity and technology has allowed her to make quite a splash in the art world, and the mesmerizing dance of water and gravity that she is able to capture makes for some truly unforgettable art.

The Tiny Universe of Lori Nix

Architects, designers, and engineers may create the world around us, but it takes an incredibly talented artist to fool a viewer into believing that they are looking at the real world, when they are actually looking at something that could fit inside a shoe box. Lori Nix creates tiny universes that could fit in a suitcase, showing that size really doesn't matter when it comes to modern art.

Beach of the Bizarre: Living Surrealist Sculptures

There's nothing like putting on your Sunday finest, breaking out your cello, and walking into the ocean for an orchestral concert. That might sound strange to you, but for Australian artist Andrew Baines, it sounds like just another day at the office. His living sculptures juxtapose normal people in strange and unexpected settings, usually involving sand, surf, and a healthy touch of Surrealism.

Burn the 'Burbs: The Installation Art of Ian Strange

The suburbs hold a certain amount of nostalgia for many people, but Australian artist Ian Strange has a bizarre relationship with that icon of the middle class - he likes to burn them down. His body of work juxtaposes large-scale installation art, video footage, symbolism, and towering infernos as a means of breaking down the constructions of society, in more ways than one.

The New Perspective: Art is Everywhere

Albert Einstein once said, "There are only two ways to live your life. One is as though nothing is a miracle. The other is as though everything is a miracle." Turkish artist Sakir Gokcebag tweaks that slightly with his common object art installations, clearly stating that there are two other ways to live your life, as though nothing is art, or as though everything is art. You can probably guess which perspective he holds.

We Are Plastic People: Bizarre Living Sculptures

The next time a trendy hipster next to you says that they are "really into art", ask them if they would like to be inside some art. If so, they might be the perfect model for Marie-Lou Desmeules' fascinating and slightly disturbing Living Sculptures, which take a shot at society and our standards of 'beauty' with their plastic facades of celebrities on top of actual people.

Hey DJ! Amazing Vinyl Portraits

Movie stars and the Gods of Rock 'n' Roll are used to seeing their faces plastered all over the world, but Alejandro de Antonio has put their faces somewhere they have probably never been. Depending on their particular artistic field, this talented Spanish artist creates their likeness on a canvas that makes sense, including old-school vinyl records and the metal canisters that film reels used to be stored in. His work is about as close to art imitating life as you can get!

The Art of Advertising

The world of art and business have been crossing paths and overlapping for hundreds of years, and from Parisian Absinthe Art to Wall Street Warhol crazes, there has been a powerful connection between art and marketing. Although this ad campaign by Guido Daniele is a few years old, it exemplifies the change in that relationship which has occurred in recent years. Our hyperconnected, light-speed generation, coupled with our throw away culture, might render certain forms of art as nothing more than a disposable tool to sell a product, rather than a lasting statement about the world at the moment of its conception.

Photography 2.0 - Time is A Dimension

When it comes to art mediums, photography is traditionally the most controversial, and the one that raises the most questions about where the limitations and boundaries of artistic creation begin and end. For more than 150 years, photography has been limited by its two-dimensional form, but Singapore-based photographer Fong Qi Wei has found a way to break out of that narrow structure and play within a new dimension of photography - Time.

Weight of the World: Hermit Crab Shell Art!

Combining art and nature is nothing new, but having live animals as participants in exhibitions is a bit more unusual. Luckily, these hermit crabs don't move too fast, particularly since they have entire artistic cityscapes on their backs, fashioned meticulously out of plastic by Japanese artist Aki Inomata.

Color Me Impressed: The Crayon Sculptures of Herb Williams

When was the last time you thought about crayons? More specifically, when was the last time you bought over 100,000 of them in order to make a sculpture? The answer is probably never, unless you're Herb Williams. He is the Cezanne of Crayon, the Calder of Crayola, and his playful works often hold many more shades of meaning and depth than meet the eye.

Strung Out: Unbelievable Thread Spool Mosaics

Imagine an artist that can create installations that look just like Picasso, Warhol, Rembrandt, Monet, and DaVinci...more impressively, she can do it without every picking up a paint brush. Devorah Sperber creates massive mosaics using thousands of spools of thread, but the image is upside down and backwards. She relies on reflections, the physics of sight, and subjective reality to give her re-mastered masterworks an unusual, unforgettable twist.

Tricking the Eye: Phenomenal 3D Art

The art world is full of surprising and unexpected styles, but there have always been some clear separations. Paintings, drawing, and photographs stay on the two-dimensional canvas, while sculptures exist in 3-D. Those boundaries are difficult to cross, unless you are Ramon Bruin, a Dutch artist who excels at blurring the lines between reality, art, and the physical boundaries of a 2-D world.

The Incredible Bone Flowers of Hideki Tokushige

We think of flowers as some of the most delicate creations in nature. We think of bone as hard and durable. Japanese artist Hideki Tokushige disagrees with that traditional separation, and in his spellbinding Bone Flowers (Honebana), he shows that artistic brilliance can turn flowers into stone and bone into silk.

Impossible Sculptures Bring Magic Back to Art!

It is not uncommon for art to be described as spectacular, fascinating, or profound, but art that seems genuinely magical is something altogether different. The mysterious and impossible sculptures of Tom Eckert challenge the perception of reality, allowing this wizard of woodcarving to bring his viewers a little closer to the magic of the art world.

A Layer of Love: Amazing Paper Art!

Many people enjoy books because they come alive and allow the author's message to blend with the creativity of the reader. Some artists take a more direct approach, like Luciana Frigerio, and choose to share their artistic message in words made out of pages, rather than in words printed on them.

The Gallery of Nature: Art of the Earth

It often seems that the modern generation of artists has become obsessed with using the most outlandish or unusual materials to create their work. Richard Shilling chooses to return to the literal roots of art and uses the elements of the natural world to inspire awareness and delight the senses.

No Joke, These Artists Are Bananas

As children, these artists were clearly never told not to play with their food. Apparently, they ran out of canvas and tradional sculpting material, so they used whatever they could get their hands on. Namely, bananas.

The Evolution of Function to Form

Everything is created for a purpose, regardless of whether that purpose is useful or pointless. But when 100 or 1000 identical things come together, they bring about a new purpose no one had ever imagined, and art emerges. English artist Laurence Poole understands and manipulates the evolution of everyday things into art that intrigues and inspires.