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Salt Energy Meets Solar Energy


Using molten salt to store solar energy, researchers hope to implement large-scale solar power generation, with a single tower capable of producing up to 500 megawatts of peak power. read more »

Swedish Building Heated With Body Heat


More than 250,000 people pass through the Stockholm Central Station every day. In the past, the body heat they release has posed problems, requiring open windows to air it out. But soon, the excess heat will be used to provide heating for a new office building nearby. read more »

The Never-Ending Fun of Lego Mindstorms (Book Review)


The Unofficial Lego Mindstorms NXT Inventor's Guide (300 pages)
David J. Perdue
(No Starch Press)

Lego Mindstorms is one of the latest educational toys aimed at getting kids interested in high-tech subjects the fun way: by building robots. Aimed at kids 10 years old and up, the robotics kit teaches young students about building, programming, and electronics. read more »

Fuel Cubes: Cheap, Clean Energy Source?


Renewafuel, a start-up company from Minnesota, has invented cubes of plant materials that provide twice as much energy as other biomass and about the same amount of energy as coal. Because these "fuel cubes" are made of materials such as switch grass, corn stalks, and wood fibers, they don't contribute to global warming, the company says. read more »

Einstein Returns from Outer Space


Einstein has returned from outer space, according to scientists, and he's taken on the form of the world's first android head with a humanoid body. The synthesis of the two distinct areas of an android robot and bi-ped humanoid robot is the first of its kind, and results in a creepy looking science genius. read more »

Superman Was Actually Afraid of Jadarite


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

One of TIME Magazine's Top 10 Scientific Discoveries of the year is the discovery of kryptonite. But by a strange twist of events, the mineral has been named "jadarite." read more »

Scientists Turn Light Into Sound


 

By turning light waves into slow-moving sound waves, researchers have developed a new method for storing information inside a fiber optic cable. read more »

World’s Smallest Advent Calendar


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

At 8.4 x 12.4 micrometers, the world's smallest advent calendar was created in a lab late one night in Germany. The motivation for the work was that the researchers wanted to have  "a nice picture of Christmas to put on our homepage." read more »

Scientists Create Glow-In-The-Dark Cats


They're cute, white, and fluffy - and they glow in the dark when exposed to ultraviolet light. The cats are actually clones. They're also the first cats to be cloned with a manipulated fluorescence protein gene. read more »

The Gay Gene Found? - Scientists Discover “Genderblind” Gene in Flies


Researchers have discovered that by increasing or decreasing the synapse strength of cells by modifying a "genderblind" (GB) gene, fruit flies can be made to demonstrate either homosexual or heterosexual behavior, respectively. read more »

Energy Tower: Power for 15 Earths?


Researchers have designed a product that its inventors claim could easily produce between 15 and 20 times the total electricity the world uses today. Not only that, it could also be used as a desalination device and may be able to reverse the effects of global warming. read more »

Little Robot With Big Guns Could Replace Human Soldiers


25-year-old Adam Gettings, a self-taught engineer, has recently created Robotex AH - a two-foot tall, 10-mph-traveling machine that can blow a 10-inch hole through a steel door from a quarter mile away. It's also remote-controlled over an encrypted frequency that jams nearby radios and cell phones. read more »

Can the Smell of Rotten Eggs Make You Live Longer?


Hydrogen sulfide makes rotten eggs smell horrible, but the chemical may also be a fountain of youth. Researchers have found that when nematode worms were exposed to an atmosphere containing a small amount of hydrogen sulfide, the worms' lifespan increased significantly. read more »

New Device Stops Cars Instantly in their Tracks


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A new device may make car chases a thing of the past.

Eureka Aerospace, a company from Pasadena, Calif., had developed a device that shoots a microwave beam at a speeding car, frying its electrical system and stopping the car dead in its tracks. read more »

Be Like Superman! Bullets Bounce Off New Super Carbon Nanotube Vest


 

Scientists have designed a vest made of carbon nanotubes that can rebound the force of a bullet, effectively causing the bullet to bounce off without causing a large impact force on the wearer. read more »

New Scanner Takes Stunning Images of Internal Organs


Philips Medical Systems has recently unveiled a new medical scanner that can take images of the inside of the body with stunning precision. read more »

Bacteria Makes Water Taste Better


Scientists noticed that old, dirty water filters seemed to make water taste better. They investigated this peculiarity, and found that tiny bacteria that thrive on dirty water filters can reduce the distasteful earthy tinge in tap water. read more »

Attotechnology Could Illuminate How Electrons Move


 

 

 

 

 

 

The motion of tiny particles such as electrons is impossible to investigate with current technology. That's because electrons, like other subatomic particles, don't move on the time scale of seconds, but of attoseconds--a billion billionth of a second, or 10-18 seconds. read more »

Scientists Trap a Rainbow


Scientists have shown how to trap a multi-colored rainbow of light inside a prism. The ability to slow down, stop, and capture different frequencies of light could lead to computers with more memory and much faster Internet speeds. read more »

First MRI of the Brain


Scientists from Los Alamos National Labs in New Mexico have recently taken the first MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) scan of the human brain. read more »