Superman Was Actually Afraid of Jadarite












One of TIME Magazine's Top 10 Scientific Discoveries of the year is the discovery of kryptonite. But by a strange twist of events, the mineral has been named "jadarite." read more »

Scientists Turn Light Into Sound


By turning light waves into slow-moving sound waves, researchers have developed a new method for storing information inside a fiber optic cable. read more »

World’s Smallest Advent Calendar











At 8.4 x 12.4 micrometers, the world's smallest advent calendar was created in a lab late one night in Germany. The motivation for the work was that the researchers wanted to have  "a nice picture of Christmas to put on our homepage." read more »

Scientists Create Glow-In-The-Dark Cats

They're cute, white, and fluffy - and they glow in the dark when exposed to ultraviolet light. The cats are actually clones. They're also the first cats to be cloned with a manipulated fluorescence protein gene. read more »

The Gay Gene Found? - Scientists Discover “Genderblind” Gene in Flies

Researchers have discovered that by increasing or decreasing the synapse strength of cells by modifying a "genderblind" (GB) gene, fruit flies can be made to demonstrate either homosexual or heterosexual behavior, respectively. read more »

Energy Tower: Power for 15 Earths?

Researchers have designed a product that its inventors claim could easily produce between 15 and 20 times the total electricity the world uses today. Not only that, it could also be used as a desalination device and may be able to reverse the effects of global warming. read more »

Little Robot With Big Guns Could Replace Human Soldiers

25-year-old Adam Gettings, a self-taught engineer, has recently created Robotex AH - a two-foot tall, 10-mph-traveling machine that can blow a 10-inch hole through a steel door from a quarter mile away. It's also remote-controlled over an encrypted frequency that jams nearby radios and cell phones. read more »

Can the Smell of Rotten Eggs Make You Live Longer?

Hydrogen sulfide makes rotten eggs smell horrible, but the chemical may also be a fountain of youth. Researchers have found that when nematode worms were exposed to an atmosphere containing a small amount of hydrogen sulfide, the worms' lifespan increased significantly. read more »

New Device Stops Cars Instantly in their Tracks










A new device may make car chases a thing of the past.

Eureka Aerospace, a company from Pasadena, Calif., had developed a device that shoots a microwave beam at a speeding car, frying its electrical system and stopping the car dead in its tracks. read more »

Be Like Superman! Bullets Bounce Off New Super Carbon Nanotube Vest


Scientists have designed a vest made of carbon nanotubes that can rebound the force of a bullet, effectively causing the bullet to bounce off without causing a large impact force on the wearer. read more »

New Scanner Takes Stunning Images of Internal Organs

Philips Medical Systems has recently unveiled a new medical scanner that can take images of the inside of the body with stunning precision. read more »

Bacteria Makes Water Taste Better

Scientists noticed that old, dirty water filters seemed to make water taste better. They investigated this peculiarity, and found that tiny bacteria that thrive on dirty water filters can reduce the distasteful earthy tinge in tap water. read more »

Attotechnology Could Illuminate How Electrons Move







The motion of tiny particles such as electrons is impossible to investigate with current technology. That's because electrons, like other subatomic particles, don't move on the time scale of seconds, but of attoseconds--a billion billionth of a second, or 10-18 seconds. read more »

Scientists Trap a Rainbow

Scientists have shown how to trap a multi-colored rainbow of light inside a prism. The ability to slow down, stop, and capture different frequencies of light could lead to computers with more memory and much faster Internet speeds. read more »

First MRI of the Brain

Scientists from Los Alamos National Labs in New Mexico have recently taken the first MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) scan of the human brain. read more »

A Heart-Powered Pacemaker

Researchers have designed a heart-powered pacemaker. Just as it sounds, the self-powering pacemaker would keep the heart beating by using the person's own heartbeat to power it. read more »

What Will Scientists Do With the World’s Smallest Microwave?

Scientists have constructed a "micro microwave," a long, narrow device measuring 4 mm long by 7 micrometers wide (the width of a red blood cell). Considered to be the smallest microwave ever, the technology will likely be used for medical "lab-on-a-chip" devices. read more »

New Body Probe Gives Panoramic View of Your Insides

Researchers have invented a tiny probe equipped with an ultrasound scanner that can travel through veins and arteries, taking ultrasound images of its surroundings. Unlike previous probes that travel through the body, which could only provide a view from one direction at a time, the new device has seven imagers integrated onto the hexagonal prism that can see nearly everywhere at once. read more »

Tiniest Radio Consists of a Single Carbon Nanotube


Researchers have fabricated what they call a true "iPod Nano"--a fully functional radio made out of a single carbon nanotube (CNT). At 10,000 times thinner than a human hair, the researchers hope the radio could have applications for new wireless communications devices, as well as medical applications such as hearing aids. read more »

CPR Glove a Handy Guide for Saving Lives


One of the winners in the health category in TIME Magazine's Best Inventions of the Year is a glove that knows CPR (cardio-pulmonary resuscitation). Since CPR is very difficult to perform properly, even for trained health professionals, the glove was designed to guide people in an emergency situation. read more »