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Boomers

Fabulous Phytotherapy with Sisleÿa Global Anti-Age Cream

Valentine’s day is just around the corner, splurge on yourself or someone you love and buy pampering in a jar with Sisleÿa Global Anti-Age Cream Day and Night Facial Treatment

Will The U.S. Constitution Stay Afloat In 2012?

Well if you've been following the partisan rhetoric emanating from the Belt Way, you might not think that the government of "We The People" is going to fare too well going into a contentious election year. However, if you're one of the 99 Percenter contingency, things might be looking a little "rosier" for you . . . and they do mean that literally.

Good Lighting Is Key To Staying Active In Your Hobbies

Many persons give up their hobbies or even aspects of their work or chores as they age.  While arthritis in their fingers and hands may be one reason they don't build model cars or quilt any more, for most boomers and seniors, it's because of vision changes.  As we age, we tend to need more light and more magnification to see clearly and sometimes even our prescription lenses don't quite measure up to what we need for hobby work. 

 


Groundbreaking Research Supports Calorie Reduction As Key To Healthy Aging

It has long been known that calorie restricted diets have positive impacts on better mental and physical health, but now a team of researchers at the Catholic University of Sacred Heart in Rome have discovered the molecule that is triggered by caloric restriction.  CREB1 is the molecule and, once activated, it triggers another group of molecules linked to longevity - the sirtuins.

Holiday Social Media Competition Lights Up "Home Decoration Smackdown" In Jersey City, Newark & Roselle

What's a little friendly competition amongst neighboring towns in New Jersey? Well this Christmas season, two councilmen and one mayor have decided to lighten up this year's holiday festivities with a house decoration competition in Jersey City, Newark and Roselle.

Sensing Microneedles Developed For Continuous Monitoring Of Body Chemicals

In the future, maybe not too distant, diabetics may be able to monitor their glucose levels continuously, rather than at one point in time, thanks to the researchers from North Carolina State University, Sandia National Laboratories, and the University of California, San Diego.  These researchers have incorporated sensors into multiple microneedles, each less than a millimeter long, that may make today's glucose analyzers, the annoying skin prick tests, obsolete.

 

Surgeons Check Out Donor Lungs 'Ex Vivo' Prior To Transplant

Surgeons at the New York Presbyterian Hospital at Columbia University performed the very first 'ex vivo' lung transplants yesterday, placing a deceased donor's lungs into a test dome for four hours to get the lungs in shape for their new human recipients.  Organ testing procedures have been available prior to now, but none as sophisticated as the XVIVA Perfusion System employed in these particular transplant surgeries.

 

With IPOs & Bankruptcy In The Air, Zynga Soars, American Airlines Zags & Alec Baldwin Zings

There's seems to be a glint of irony taking to the not-so-friendly skies, or so one popular TV-star would like the world to believe. While online gaming giant Zynga hopes to reap between $850 million and $1.15 billion with its impending IPO offering on the Nasdaq Stock Exchange, the venerable American Airlines files Chapter 11 to reorganize its massive debt. So what's the connection between the two companies where one's on an uptick and the other is in dire straits financially? Well… Alec Baldwin, oddly, it seems!

For-Profit Vs. Non-Profit: A Scary Study Of Nursing Homes

Those of you whose parents are at the age where a nursing home is being considered as an option for their care may just want to pay attention to the results of a recent study led by the University of California San Francisco (UCSF).  It compares the staffing and quality of care at for-profit nursing homes with that of non-profit facilities.

X Prize: Geneticists Compete To Duplicate Genomes Of Centenarians

The search is truly on for what makes people live past 100 years ... aside from eating right, exercising regularly, and having lots of social contact.  It's about their genomic makeup, and Archon Genomics is holding a big, as in 10 million dollars, prize for the first genetics team to develop the sequence of genes that can produce medical grade genomes from 100 centenarians.  Personalized medicine, here we come!

Portrait Of 60s Protester Adds Perspective To Occupy Movement In Song

Where have all the protest songs gone? Are they still blowing in the wind, or have new ones surfaced to chronicle life's current strife? While it seems like only yesterday, it's actually been over 40 years since Americans felt angry and disenfranchised enough to assemble in solidarity and  protest against injustice and greed.

Do Obese Persons Lack The Guts To Lose Weight?

Determination. Willpower. Courage.  Overweight people need all of these characteristics.  But what they may need most is guts. Their guts may not be communicating certain messages to their brains, like "We're full! Stop eating now! We can't hold any more!  Now, studies conducted at the Imperial College London suggest that there may be a solution to this problem.

 


Testosterone Levels Helpful In Determining Risk Of Heart Disease

A study by the Wallenberg Laboratory for Cardiovascular Research in Sweden followed 2,400 men in their 70's and 80's for five years, comparing their testosterone levels with incidents of cardiovascular events the men experienced, such as heart attacks and strokes....

Laser Beams Detect Blood Glucose In Early Experiments

For millions of people with diabetes, daily finger pricking with needles in order to get a measurement of their blood glucose is an accepted, but unpleasant, part of their lifestyles. Though physicists have been trying to come up with laser beam technology that effectively substitutes for the needle, the accomplishment has evaded them for the past 20 years.  Now, physicists at the University of Toronto (UT) have found a way to get around the most prickly problem with using a laser beam....

 


Afinitor® Stops Tumor Growth & Lengthens Lives For Breast Cancer Patients

Afinitor®, the Novartis trademark for the cancer fighter, everolimus, is used for the treatment of advanced renal cell carcinoma (RCC), inoperable cases of certain pancreatic cancers, and to aid successful acceptance of transplants.  Now, the results of a Phase III study of Afinitor administered to women with advanced breast cancer have been announced, and the words used to describe the drug are "game changer."

 

Study Links B12 Deficiency With Low Cognition In Older Persons

Few of us will eat liver, and there are some good health reasons, as well as taste and texture concerns, why. But there are other natural sources of vitamin B12 that may not be so objectionable, and if you can get fish, meat, milk, eggs and poultry into your food regimen, you may just want to do that.

Osteoporosis Drug Found To Improve Arthritis Too!

Arthritis is a joint disease that results in a progressive loss of cartilage, just as osteoporosis results in progressive loss of bone.  Though osteoporosis drugs are intended to regenerate bone growth, to date, arthritis drugs can only reduce inflammation and, thereby, reduce pain.  But observation of patients taking a certain osteoporosis drug, by researchers at the University of Rochester Medical Center (URMC), led to the recent finding that this drug not only restored bone but cartilage as well.

 


C-Mill: A Plug & Play Treadmill For Gait Training & Rehabilitation

Learning to walk again after breaking a leg or hip, having a stroke, prosthetic, or partial paralysis depends on a lot of persistence and an excellent rehabilitation program that can guide you through gait training.  Movement scientist Dr. Melvyn Roerdink from The Netherlands has developed a super smart, oversized treadmill that helps rehab patients gain confidence in their new gaits, with bells, whistles, and even light shows.

 


Harvard Nutritionists Develop Their Own Plate For Healthy Eating

The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) revamped its healthy eating recommendations a few months ago with a new visual - an icon called 'MyPlate,' replacing the former healthy foods pyramid icon.  The Nutrition Source at the Harvard School of Public Health thinks the government's plate lacks a good bit of guidance as to which specific foods should be eaten - after all MyPlate offers no guidance.

 


Electronic Salinity Monitor Spoon Terminates Excessive Salt Intake

The ready-for-brine-time Salinity Monitor Spoon measures how salty your soup or sauce is and displays the results on its handle. The easy to use "Stir-minator" spoon could be a boon to elderly sufferers of high blood pressure whose sense of taste isn't as sensitive as it once was.