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Advice for Inventors

Inventor Advice: Prototype or Drawing?


Trying to decide whether you need a prototype of your invention?

Our Guest Blogger, Frank Morosky, is an Entrepreneur Consultant. He assists people with business ideas or inventions get their business started quickly and on a tight budget. His website is at fmorosky.home.mchsi.com. He wanted to share his experiences with prototyping with the readers of AmericanInventorSpot.com.

Here's his article: read more »

Insider Expose on Invention Promotion Firms!


Did you ever wonder how some Invention Promotion Firms actually work?

Our Guest Blogger, Terri Phillips, is an inventor of numerous products. She has worked at an Invention Promotion Firm. She now works in marketing, packaging, and product development for an inventor service company that provides a means of distribution for inventors to sell their products through AccessInventors.com. Terri's goal is to educate inventors from the inside out, so she wrote this article exclusively for the readers of AmericanInventorSpot.com.

Here's her article: read more »

ABC's American Inventor Finalist, Erik Thompson, Invests Winnings to help other Inventors


Eric & DanardEric & DanardPRESS RELEASE

ABC's American Inventor Finalist, Erik Thompson, Invests Winnings to help other Inventors

As most of America knows, Mr. Thompson was awarded $50,000 from the hit ABC show for the rights to his Catch Vest, but what might surprise you is what he did with the money. After saving his house from foreclosure, Mr. Thompson took the majority of his winnings and started a company, "Belykewater Productions." read more »

Get Your Idea to Market WITHOUT an Invention Submission Firm


Invention: Power Pitch HorseshoesInvention: Power Pitch Horseshoes

Did you know you don't need to use an Invention Submission Firm to show your ideas to manufacturers?

Our guest blogger Roger Brown is a freelance Inventor who has successfully marketed tools,
toys and a kitchen utensil without the aid of an Invention Submission Firm. You can see some of his inventions at rogerbrown.net. He graciously agreed to share with readers of AmericanInventorSpot.com some valuable advice. Here's his article: read more »

Have Any Good Ideas?


I thought it may be fun to have a place for folks to share their good ideas.

For the inventors out there, it may inspire them to come up with something new and fantastic. Have you thought of anything the world could use, that does not seem to be on the market today that would be great if someone invented?

Have you come across anything recently that you thought was a great idea?

More...
read more »

Starting a Small Business and Need Some Advice?


When you start a small business, you have to do everything.

Do you feel like you have so much to do to get your business on track and sometimes, feel overwhelmed by all that you need to do and all that you don't know how to do? Well, as you know, the web can be a terrific resource for small business owners and other entrepreneurs. But how can you find the good resources that are out there?


read more »

What You Need to Ask Your Prototyper


Guest blogger William Colbath continues his helpful series on Prototyping with the following article for AmericanInventorSpot.com :

* * * * *

Hi all.

Hope you are all doing well. I want to thank everyone that
wrote me about the death of my great granddaughter. Your comments were appreciated.

Last week I talked about engineers, this week I am going to talk a little about prototypers and what makes them tick.
read more »

Wade Sun's 13 Rules of Invention Success - Part 4


Wade Sun is the inventor of the Disc Eraser™. He has written an article for AmericanInventorSpot.com readers as a guest blogger to share the lessons he learned as he went through the process of developing his invention.

Over the past week, we published the first three parts of his four part series on his 13 Rules of Invention Success. Here is Part 4 of his 4 part series:

read more »

An Inventor's Toolkit: What Every Inventor Needs


We asked Carl, our terrific guest blogger from Inventive Rants to write about some of the critical elements to success in inventing. This week, he chose to write on the Inventor's Toolkit as his special posting for American Inventor Spot readers.

* * * *
When I invented my product, I read every book I could find on success, invention and making money. Looking back, I don't think that any one book put it all together for me, but here is a list of things that did help me.


read more »

Wade Sun's 13 Rules of Invention Success - Part 3


Wade Sun is the inventor of the Disc Eraser™. He has written an article for AmericanInventorSpot.com
AmericanInventorSpot.com readers as a guest blogger.

Yesterday, we published Part 1 and 2 of a 4 part series on his 13 Rules of Invention Success. Here is Part 3 of 4:

read more »

Wade Sun's 13 Rules of Invention Success - Part 1


Wade Sun is the inventor of the Disc Eraser™. I have been reading his comments here at AmericanInventorSpot.com for some time and I thought he had some great advice to share with fellow inventors. So I contacted him about two weeks ago to see if he would be interested in being a guest blogger and writing an article to share what he had learned going through the invention process.

Luckily, he said yes. When we discussed ideas for article topic, he suggested an article illustrating how he brings his invention to a finished prototype with a plastics molding kit and a little creativity. He could use it as a vehicle to share his 13 rules of invention success.

read more »

Exploring New Markets for Your Invention


We asked Carl, our terrific guest blogger from Inventive Rants to write about some of the critical elements to success in inventing. Today, he chose to write on the importance of exploring new markets for your invention as this week's special posting for American Inventor Spot readers.

* * * *

It may seem obvious to most, but inventors tend to have blinders on when it comes to markets. I was guilty of this error, and I now know how to avoid this mistake in the future.

read more »

Good Communication is Critical in Building a Prototype


Guest blogger William Colbath continues his series on Prototyping with the following article:

Hi all!

How bout the American Inventor show? They are down to the final twelve and firmly into my territory PROTOTYPING! For me it couldn't be more exciting. This may not seem to exciting to some ofyou, but to the contestants it could mean the difference between winning or not!
read more »

Marketing the Invention, Marketing Yourself


We asked Carl, our terrific guest blogger from Inventive Rants to address the issue of marketing once you have a patented invention as a special posting for American Inventor Spot readers. Here it is:

*******

An invention can come to you in minutes, yet it has no value until someone decides to part with their hard earned money to buy it. Marketing is 99% of invention success. read more »

Getting Your Prototypes Done: Typical Terms of a Prototyping Relationship


Hi all!

So now that you have drawn up your plans for your totally cool invention, perhaps some plans for your voice activated rotary easy chair mounted beer can dispenser that chills the can, opens it and puts it in your hand. (Wow, it just dawned on me that this would be a great invention as I would surely buy one.) You have talked to experts in the field, done a patent search, done your market research. And now you have to commit to a prototyper to help you build your prototype. What to do now?

read more »

The Invention Timeline


Carl, our terrific guest blogger from Inventive Rants created a special posting for American Inventor Spot talking about the key timing issues related to the inventing
process. I think its an essential read for all inventors:

The Invention Timeline

Inventors want to know, how long does the process take? How long does it take from "Eureka" to "royalty check"? The short answer is that it will take anywhere from 1-4 years for an invention to earn money. The key to accelerating the process is networking. Every-time you bring a value-added participant into your venture, you increase the likelihood of moving forward.

read more »

Inventor Survival - Incorporating the Concept of Survival Into the Process


Carl is the blogger for Inventive Rants.
He is a successful inventor who produced an enhancement for manufacturing semiconductor chips in the nanoparticle process. I don't even know what that means so I just figure he's brilliant!

He had a blog posting about inventing that we thought was terrific so we asked him if he would mind if we incorporated a copy of it here. He happily said yes. Even better, he agreed to be a guest blogger and will be writing a special article (maybe a few if we're lucky) for American Inventor Spot soon. In the meantime, here's the blog posting that we wished we had written:

Inventor Survival

The problem with most how-to books on inventing a new product is that they focus on the fundamentals too much. Let's say you invent the next great widget that will make a million dollars; how do you survive the process?

read more »

Don't Just Keep Hanging On!!


bratonboard

One of the most important things for any successful person is the ability to take feedback. Can you stand to hear the truth? Or are you just hanging on to what you want to hear? read more »

Giving Up My Two Front Teeth


2teeth

For inventors to be successful, they do not necessarily have to give up their two front teeth or their right arm in order to develop and market their products successfully.

You need to be as inventive in getting your idea out without too much risk to your livelihood and your pocketbook as you were in having the great idea in the first place. read more »

Do You Know Who Your Customer Is?


ChestRest104mid

For your product, you need to clarify who would be likely to buy you product and figure out how to make your product attractive to that audience. It's very helpful to put yourself in the shoes of who the buyer might be and craft your product and advertising pitch to make sure that type of buyer would be moved by your meesage to buy your product. read more »