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Video Games Worth Killing For

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2.) Resident Evil 4

 

Resident Evil 4Resident Evil 4

I crept along the dark alleyway, reloading my weapons as I went. About the time that I had enough ammo to reenter combat, more Ganados approached. The alley was filled with muzzle flashes. By the end of the conflict, dead bodies lay strewn all around me, silent and unmoving. I was finally safe; for now.

Resident Evil 4 gives you control of Leon Kennedy, a United States secret agent. Your mission is to rescue the President’s daughter, who has been kidnapped by a radical “terrorist” group located somewhere in Europe. Once you arrive at the believed location of this mysterious group, you discover the local townspeople all seem to be in on the plot. As you play through the game, the secrets behind the kidnapping of the President’s daughter are uncovered, and you discover several horrifying secrets about the town and its people (who are known as Ganados).

The violence in Resident Evil 4 is not that different from many of the action films from Hollywood. Gameplay revolves around the use of firearms, which are used to kill literally thousands of enemies throughout the game. Blood and gore in the game is excessive, which is why the game received a Mature (17+) rating from ESRB. The most disgusting part about the violence in Resident Evil 4, however, is if your character (Leon) gets killed by a chainsaw-wielding Ganado (shown above), you become decapitated!

Resident Evil 4 is still a great game because of its strong storyline and detailed characters. The graphics in the game are good, but they aren’t impressive when compared to the next generation console games. Leon’s story in Resident Evil 4 is fun and compelling, and will guarantee a good time for both franchise and non-franchise fans.

 

1.) Gears of War

Gears of WarGears of WarAfter the slaughter of nearly 20 locust forces, there was only one remaining. Stepping out from cover, I sprinted directly at the standing enemy. Revving up my chainsaw bayonet, I slowly sliced through my target like a knife through butter. Through the monster’s shrill scream I could only see red, and feel the warm, red blood cover me completely. Leaving the locust behind in two completely separate pieces, I wiped my face clean, and continued on towards another group of locusts ahead.

Gears of War leads you through a human struggle against an unlikely enemy. Set sometime in the future, you play as Marcus Fenix in his quest to finish the war between the humans and locusts (a fictional alien-like creature) once and for all. In the beginning of the game, Marcus is released from a prison that is holding him for a crime he did not commit. Immediately after being released, he is reinserted into the COG, a military force that protects a small group of humans that survived the locust invasion. Over the course of five acts, Marcus and his teammates (with help from their superiors) fight the locusts and end the war once and for all.

Like most wars, the most significant feature in Gears of War is violence. In the game you can use a chainsaw bayonet (attached to the end of the COG soldiers’ main weapon) to slice enemies in half, as well as blowing locusts into pieces using either a shotgun or a sniper rifle (among other weapons). When you shoot enemies, a large amount of blood sprays from their body. In some cases, when you shoot a locust’s legs, you can knock them to their knees. While they kneel on the ground crying for help, you can walk up to them and either shoot them to death or you can “curb stomp” them (a term for stomping on their head). When you do this, the locust’s head explodes and blood flies everywhere. The game is played in the third person perspective (a camera over the main character’s right shoulder), but the blood that sprays from locusts in your immediate vicinity sprays onto the camera as well, making look as if the blood is actually dripping from your television screen. After a few moments, however, the blood is wiped clean so that you can continue playing without the visual distraction.

After a huge amount of hype prior to the release of Gears, it received almost perfect reviews by multiple websites and magazines (GameSpot, Game Trailers, Team XBox, and Game Informer). Although the game is very violent in nature, it can also be enjoyed by those who don’t like all the blood and gore. To do so, there is a setting within the game in which you can turn off the intense gore. When this setting is turned on, you won’t see any blood, and locusts will not become dismembered like they normally would. This setting also works when playing on XBox Live; this way you can enjoy playing with (or against) people from around the world without the blood and gore.

 

Though many games today are violent, that doesn’t make them any worse than the classic games from the Super Nintendo era. While government officials continue to debate over the restrictions of sales on Mature rated games to underage gamers, parents continue to buy games for their underage children, not even knowing that it may or may not harm their child. Violent video games may not be for everybody, but there are a fair share of them that are still great games, despite the violence in them.

Please let me know what you think should be on this list, or any comments you may have about my list! Thanks!

 

Matt Wood
mattsbomb40@yahoo.com

AmericanInventorSpot.com
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Note: Although I don't mention an M Rating for all these games, they are all M Rated. I mentioned the M rating only for the games that are extremely blood or gory.

To find an explanation of some of the gaming terminolgy used in my article, check out:

Comments
Nov 30, 2006
by Shaggy (not verified)

Another game

Postal 2, very violent, extremely fun and funny.